Outdoor cooking: Favorites from Abisko

Food tends to be important. In our family, this is an understatement. Simplicity, nutrition, and energy content — with an eye for gourmet dining — would be one way of summarizing what we aim for when putting together our food list for the outdoors. Here follows a short description of our feeding strategies. 

Breakfast

M&M’s favorite breakfast is also quite convenient from a cooking point of view. We make blueberry soup and serve it up in each person’s “kåsa” (“guksi” in Sami), then we add about 1 dl of oat flakes directly into the kåsa and stir it up. The end result is blueberry oatmeal. The oatmeal is complemented by a generous dollop of our homemade superspackle. Our superspackle recipe is very simple: we mix honey into peanut butter until we get a manageable spackle-like texture. We keep the superspackle in a zip-lock bag, which works great; at the relatively low temperatures expected in Lapland our spackle is fairly solid, but becomes runny when heated up. We sometimes also like to add a handful of granola or nuts to the oatmeal. This makes for a really good breakfast that gives you both a quick energy spike in the morning and also plenty of slow carbohydrates and fat to keep you going for a good while.

blueberryoatmeal

Blueberry oatmeal. This particular batch is actually made with real, freshly picked blueberries during one of our annual summer bike tours, but it’s similar to the one we make with blueberry soup.

Our breakfast procedure goes like this: we bring water to a near-boil, pour hot water into cups for those who would like some coffee or tea, then add the blueberry soup powder to the pot, stir, and pour the soup into our kåsa cups. Alternatively, we sometimes add the blueberry soup powder directy to the cups in order to minimize dishwashing.

Snacks

Gorp: Mixed nuts, pumpkin seeds, raisins, cranberries, sunflower seeds. We really like to have some salted nuts in the mix, because there’s something magical about the flavor combination of sweet raisins and salted cashews or almonds.

Chocolate: Any and various types of solid chocolate. M&M’s absolute favorite from Abisko was Milka’s Triolade, which is a combination of milk, white, and dark bitter chocolate. We do not like candy bars with lots of toffee or sugary goo in them, but sometimes bring one or two as emergency instant energy to combat fatigue if somebody bonks out. 

Lunch and Dinner or Big meal and Little meal

We like to cook something warm for lunch. Depending on our hiking plans, we either have the largest meal of the day for lunch, or later when we have stopped for the night. It all depends on how far we will hike, how strenuous the hike is, and on the weather. So, it makes more sense to talk about ‘big meals’ vs ‘little meals’ rather than lunch vs dinner.

Little meal: soup + bread with salami or cheese, followed by coffee or hot chocolate + a piece of chocolate for dessert. Bread is usually cracker bread (aka ‘crispbread’) or tortillas. The former is bulky, but contains more energy/weight than you’d think. Tortillas are really easy to fit into the pack, and are also energy rich.

Soup (powdered)We usually get the type that comes in a flat envelope. The ideal is instant soup, which can be made directly in our kåsa cups. Most types that call for simmering for 5 minutes or so work just fine without simmering; we simply bring the soup to a quick boil and then wrap the pot in our evazote mat and let it sit there for 10-15 minutes.

Big meal: We make our own dried food. It is very easy and fun and the end result is usually really good! Better than most ready-made outdoor foods and very much cheaper. We don’t use a dehydrator, but simply use our hot-air convection oven. We spread the cooked dish in a thin layer on an oven tray, and dry it at 50-70 C. Every so often we open the oven to let humid air out and stir the food a bit. The food is dry after some 8-12 hours and then we weigh it out into ‘big meal for 4’ portions that go into zip-lock freezer bags and then into the freezer until we leave for out trip. Here are a few of the dishes we like: red lentils, tomatoes, onions, shallots, garlic, herbs; chickpeas, tomatoes, onions, garam masala, curry, coconut milk; green or puy lentils, bacon, red onions, shallots, garlic, herbs; chicken in green curry (thai style); minced meat, tomatoes, onions, shallots, garlic, herbs. We cook these dishes in the normal way, except that we let them go relatively dry before we put them in the oven. These dishes are combined with couscous or noodles, which we add (uncooked) directly to the same zip-lock bag.

The ‘cooking’ procedure on the trail goes like this: heat water to a boil and pour this into the zip-lock bag containing the dried dish + couscous or noodles. Stir thoroughly. Close the zip again, put the bag in the empty pot used to boil water, wrap it all up in the evazote mat, and let it sit for some 15-25 minutes.

Notes to self

Next time we absolutely must not forget to bring butter and shallots so that we can sautee mushrooms and fry fish. Butter is critical and shallots are a proven secret ingredient that enhances just about any dish, perhaps especially mushrooms and fish. A few cloves of garlic wouldn’t hurt either.

Other edibles that mother Nature offered

Cloudberries and cranberries, albeit in very small quantities (it was too early in the season, we think). Mushrooms and artic char, as already reported on this blog.

 Food-prep and eating utensils

Our cook kit for the Abisko trip has been mentioned in a previous post. Here’s a short list of our eating utensils: 4 kåsa cups (one each), 2 plastic sporks (for M&M), 2 plastic spoons (for mom & dad), 1 plastic fork, 1 plastic knife, 1 pair of wooden chopsticks, 2 plastic kid’s tumblers (from IKEA), 2 plastic thermal mugs with lids, small Wenger pocket knife (with knife blade, corkscrew, tweezers, scissors, and can opener).

Mom & dad really like to be able to enjoy warm coffee or tea for longer than 1–2 minutes. Hence the need for thermal mugs. Unfortunately, our current mugs don’t pack down very well because of the big ugly handles. The ideal thermal mug holds some 300 ml, doesn’t have a handle, is lightweight, has a good insulating lid, and just imagine if it would stack… Where can we find this? Please advise!

Philosophy

The greatest challenge for mom & dad on a multi-day trek is to make sure that everyone replenishes their energy stores at the right time, so that we avoid the dire consequences of somebody bonking out. This requires careful monitoring of everybody’s mood and strength. We distribute small ‘rewards’, like a handful of nuts or a piece of chocolate, to celebrate a peak or saddle or new vista that we’ve gained from our efforts during the last half-hour to hour, depending on how strenuous the hike is.

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