Kids’ Kits: clothing and gear for Lapland

As already reported on this blog, we went hiking in the Abisko region this summer. Here’s a short write-up on M&M’s gear. What worked and what didn’t work, etc.

BackpacksAlpkit Gourdon 25 liter for Mattias (12 years old). Simply perfect! The Gourdon is essentially a drybag with shoulder straps + a hip strap (not a hip belt). It fits M just about perfectly and carries very well. The Gourdon accommodated all of M’s personal gear: sleeping bag and pad, night-bag (sleep socks, merino longjohns) and day-bag (fleece hat, gloves, extra layer), ditty bag with sun glasses and binoculars, and Crocs; except for his raingear, which was kept in a side-pocket of mom’s backpack. M’s sleeping pad (Thermarest Pro, size regular) was folded four times and packed inside his Gourdon to serve as an extra back support, which worked very well. His night- and day-bags were both Alpkit Airlok 4 liter drybags, which is overkill, really, given that they were packed inside the Gourdon. However, the extra margin of rain protection never hurts when you are hit by the sudden urge to rummage around in your backpack during a downpour.

Upward bound towards the pass. M carries his Alpkit Gourdon with ease and comfort.

Osprey Jet 18 for Myra (9 years old). Very good, although a bit too small. M carried her sleeping bag in the main compartment, together with her day-bag containing her fleece balaclava and gloves, while her raingear went into the outer stretch pocket, her Crocs went into one of the stretch side-pockets, and a 500 ml PET bottle went into the other side-pocket. She shared her night-bag with mom, and this was packed in mom’s backpack. M’s sleeping pad, a first-generation (25+ years old) Thermarest, size short, was folded three times and packed inside mom’s backpack (GoLite Jam) to provide a bit more structure than the integral backpad does. Next year, we should probably upgrade M to a Gourdon, or perhaps a less bulky sleeping bag (see below), which would leave more room in the Jet for the rest of her kit.

Sleeping bagsAlpkit Pipedream 400 for Mattias. The PD400 was stuffed into an Alpkit Airlok 13 liter drybag and kept at the bottom of the Gourdon. The PD400 is arguably the best value for money in sleeping bags out there. Very well designed and well made, 750 grams with 400 grams of 750+ down (EU fill weight), rated to –3 ‘C. M slept very comfortably in his 200 merino baselayer down to +2-3 ‘C. He really likes the fabric, which is soft like silk to the touch. A great bag.

Mattias’ sleep system also includes an MLD Superlight bivy bag with the optional ‘all net head area’. The Thermarest Prolite goes inside the bivy bag, of course. We typically use the Exped Multimat as a torso-level ground cover under the Trailstar, while a sheet of polycryo goes under our legs.

TNF Cat’s meow for Myra, stuffed into an Alpkit Airlok 13 liter drybag. This is a nice synthetic bag that has had a strong following for many years, albeit not perhaps among lightweighters. It’s a good bag for kids (and adults), ruggedly built to handle some serious abuse (not that this is needed any longer; at age 9, M takes good care of her belongings).

Yippee! The clouds are lifting. M on her way towards the sun and the Gorsa glacier further up the valley.

Rain wear: Didrikson Tigris Junior set for both kids. The Tigris is water- and windproof, with taped seams. M & M really like their Tigris rain jackets and pants, and are now working on their second pair. Despite being relatively light (compared to most other kids’ models), the Tigris has withstood a lot of serious abuse through the years and is the kids’ go-to rain gear for everyday use throughout the year. The uppers breath well enough that they also serve as wind jackets. Very good value for money, in our opinion.

Pants: Marmot Boy’s Cruz and Girl’s Lobo’s convertible pants. These are essentially the same model, but slightly tweaked to suit boys and girls, respectively. Both were excellent. Made out of a single layer of 100% nylon, these pants dry out in no time. The leg zip-off feature came in handy when we forded streams. It is really rather surprising how relatively few good outdoor pants there are available for kids, at least in Sweden. Most are way too heavy, with multiple layers, including Cordura or other industrial-strength materials. Kevlar anyone? Yeah, right. Several manufacturers do make very good kids’ pants, but they do not seem to make their way to Sweden in any great numbers, unfortunately.

Fleece: Patagonia Synchilla Marsupial (which seems to be discontinued?) for Mattias and an old nondescript fleece hoody for Myra. Mattias also prefers a fleece hoody, but we couldn’t find any good and reasonably priced ones at the time of buying. By contrast, the Marsupial was a steal at a recent sale. Super nice and toasty, it immediately became a big favorite of M’s.

Base layers: Both M & M wear Smartwool or Icebreaker merino, typically of 200 g/m2 weight. Both kids had synthetic underwear to make sure a wet butt doesn’t stay wet for days on end, which tends to happen when you use cotton undies. As a matter of fact, cotton is essentially banned from our gear list. We are looking for merino underwear for the kids, but haven’t found any so far. Please let us know (post a comment) if you know of any!

Socks: Smartwool or Woolpower liner socks. Our entire family particularly likes the Woolpower liner socks, which is all we need, even for temperatures down to freezing, as long as we are on the go. Our sleep socks are thicker, typically of the “expedition weight” quality.

Shoes: Adidas running shoes for Mattias (a very old and ragged pair that was well worn in). Adidas gore-tex lined shoes for Myra. Neither were optimal. The insoles couldn’t be removed from Mattias shoes, which made them dry relatively slowly, despite the predominance of well-ventilating mesh on the uppers. Same thing goes for the gore-tex lined shoes, once they get wet they tend to stay wet. We will hunt around for running shoes or trail runners with removable insoles, well-ventilating mesh fabric, and without any water-impermeable barrier. Both kids also brought their Crocs, which they slipped into in camp if their shoes were wet. They also used their Crocs for planned fording of wider streams. Dad threaded some elastic cord through the holes in the Crocs and tied the cord around M & M’s ankles to make sure the Crocs didn’t sail away when we waded through the jåkks.

Gloves: Rab Polartec Powerdry for Mattias, Icebreaker merino liners for Myra + a pair of generic fleece mitts. We will probably complement these with a rainproof barrier.

Hats: Fleece balaclava (from MEC) for Myra, fleece bucket with inca-style earflaps (from REI) for Mattias. Both are old favorites and worked very well.

That’s it, that’s all we need. A few tweaks here and there, and then we have a solid system in place.

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